Tag Archives: event planning budget

Do you trust your partners?

Whether it is with a friend, spouse, family member, client, or service provider, a true partnership is built on a number of factors… the most important if these is trust.

What does trust look like in a professional relationship, let’s say for instance, your Event Technology Management company. Ask yourself these questions when evaluating whether or not there is trust between the two parties:

1) Can I share my budget with them and feel comfortable knowing that they will spend my money as if it is their own?

2) Can I sleep at night knowing that there is no way they would ever let me down? At the end of the day, execution far outweighs price.

3) When something goes wrong, are they pointing fingers or are they offering solutions to remedy the situation ASAP, even if it is not their area of expertise?

4) Do they trust me?

If you can answer yes to these questions, you probably have a very good partnership and can rest easy that you are getting a quality product for a fair price, and that you are working with someone that is as invested in the project as you are.  Knowing you can trust the people you surround yourself with will not only allow you to be successful, it will save you a lot of energy and stress.

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Modify & Adjust – How Good Are Your Partners?

The secret to any successful event, from any perspective, is the ability to modify and adjust.  In every aspect of planning and executing an event, there are bound to be unexpected challenges and changes.  The ability of your team of trusted partners to modify and adjust quickly, efficiently, and cost effectively is what will be the defining note of your symphony.

Your attendance numbers spike a few days out, can the venue you’ve chosen handle the change? There are issues with shipments and the lobster tails won’t make it.  Does  the caterer you’ve chosen to partner with have solutions to ensure your guests, who have paid $250 for their ticket, will still be impressed and pleased with their meal?  The hotel books one of the salons of your ballroom for an evening event, causing an air wall to have to be closed, which was not part of the plan when your event technology management partner installed their truss grid and rigged all of their equipment in the room.  Are you confident that the partner you have chosen to work with has the ability to modify and adjust and find a viable, cost effective solution so that everyone is happy?

Keep an eye out for the Advanced Staging Productions newsletter in October, which will give you a real world example of how we had to modify and adjust to an air wall issue after finalizing our room set-up, complete with pixel mapping.  If you are not currently receiving our newsletter, and would like to, please email Kim Pagliaro-Bussard at KimPB@AdvancedStaging.com.

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Keeping Event Labor Costs Under Control: An Insider’s Guide

You probably allocate specific portions of your budget for specific components of your event planning like event labor costs and email2equipment rental. When you glance at your final balance, it may seem a little off, but you come to the conclusion that it was money well spent for a fantastic end result. Sound like a familiar scenario?

While a great event is the end goal, you don’t want to waste any money in reaching that goal. An often overlooked aspect of event budgeting is labor. You want to provide the right compensation for all those involved in making your event a success, but sometimes, some of that hard work may be unnecessary.

Here are 6 cost-increasing tasks that you might want to consider cutting out of your event planning budget.

1. Overnight Sets

Some clients don’t want to reserve their venue the day before the event, so they have their AV crew set up overnight. The amount of overtime and double-time this accrues may end up costing even more than an early rental, especially if you’re working with a union facility.

2. Rigging

Event planners often have to pay the venue for rigging points, as well as the labor involved in setting them up. Talk with your event technology team before making a decision on rigging points. They may tell you they are unnecessary, or help you find a less expensive way to rig the equipment.

3. Loading Docks

Depending on how much equipment your event requires, this may not be an issue for you. If you have a full load of heavy equipment, a loading dock is going to be extremely beneficial, but make sure it’s reasonably close to the venue entrance. Otherwise, you’re looking at a higher volume of man-power and, therefore, higher event labor costs.

4. Venue Access

As an event planner, you want to be as close to your venue as often as possible. Do your budget a favor and choose a venue open 99% of the time, so you are able to work in it every minute you are paying for it. If you hire a venue with strict access times, like a museum or office building, you run the risk of paying for unused time.

5. Crew Breaks

Be sure to give your crew the occasional break. For them, this means time to re-group, eat, etc. For your budget, this means less overtime and less time in general on the clock. Your crew and your payroll are going to thank you.

6. Miscommunication

A misunderstanding has the potential to spiral into a very expensive waste of time. Avoid confusion or missed messages by establishing a clear line of communication with your labor crew and your technology team.

There are many cost-inducing factors that slip by in the midst of your hectic planning schedule. Don’t look for ways to cut corners, but keep a tight grip on your event planning budget by avoiding any unnecessary tasks and taking advantage of every cost-saving opportunity.

Want to discover more ways to save with your event planning budget? Contact the event technology management experts at Advanced Staging Productions at 866-431-8202 for assistance with all your planning budget needs.

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